jonathanredic:

railpass:

Colorado, Day Three: Colorado River Road Century

Days like these.

Clouds like these.

Roads like these.

We did it on road bikes. Mine in particular I shoved the fattest, albeit still skinny (25c), tires I could. They worked well enough, I guess. I’m really, really, really glad I can turn off the self-preservation part of my brain so well, y’all. Cooking it down these long, curvy hills with the washboards, cattle gates, and ruts on skinny tires may have presented me a lot of chances to get seriously injured in a remote location, but it’s really easy to not care when you have a hugest smile ever on your face.

But, that’s why we do it, you know? Grind up miserable grades in the wind, listening to knee cartilage deteriorate, all for the fleeting moments of feeling like more than just a person before the universe puts something in the road to make you go “fuckfuckfuckfuckfuck” and start pumping the brakes. The high after making it through safe, but almost not safe, is like no other.

Heading out that morning with overcast, my camera spent the day going in and out of a drysack in case it ever decided to pour on us. For the most part though, our route along the Colorado River stayed dry and crazy rad looking.

Watching the scenery change from the alpine highlands where we were staying to the dusty scrub of the canyons was so surreal. Partially because the little bit of searchandstate​ gear we had for the ride was sufficient, and partially because I was constantly heating up from the some most gnarly climbs my dumb flatlander legs have ever experienced, I didn’t really notice that our temps ranged from 30-70ªF. And like don’t get me wrong- this 100 mile ride could have become absolutely miserable real fast either with the weather or road conditions, but like I said when it all works out you are left feeling amazing.

lupum pleeaaaseeee

Say no more, when are we leaving?